Archived News



Bloomberg Businessweek Ranks Haas Accounting Program #3

The Haas School placed third in a ranking of the best undergraduate business schools for accounting released by Bloomberg Businessweek on April 22.

The ranking of 124 undergraduate business programs in the U.S. is based on an online survey of undergraduate business students from the class of 2013. BYU Brigham Young University ranked #1 followed by Notre Dame as #2.

Berkeley-Haas is the only school among the top 10 on the list that does not have a formal accounting program, major, or specific degree. See the rest of the rankings here.



Congratulations to Professor Yaniv Konchitchki on Multiple Achievements!

Yaniv Konchitcki Berkeley-Haas Professor Yaniv Konchitchki excels both in research and in teaching. He received this year’s Hellman Fellows Fund Research Award for "Showing Capacity for Great Distinction in Research."This is a competitive and large award, selected across the University and determined by UC Berkeley’s Chancellor and a prominent faculty panel. At the same time, MBA students awarded Konchitchki the prestigious Cheit Award for Excellence in Teaching, the highest teaching award bestowed upon professors at Berkeley Haas: http://www.haas.berkeley.edu/faculty/awards.html. Learn more.





California Society of Certified Public Accountants East Bay Chapter Scholarship Winners 2012-2013

Award Decipients Roy Hadar and Yevgeniy Pilipovskiy (not pictured, Denney Choi) Congratulations to students Roy Hadar, Yevgeniy Pilipovskiy, and Denney Choi, who were awarded California Society of Certified Public Accountants East Bay Chapter scholarships for 2012-13. The merit based scholarships range from $3,000 - $6,000 and are awarded to students with an interest in pursuing accounting careers.




Investor Beware: Stock Analysts’ Rounded Forecasts Are More Inaccurate and Upwardly Biased

Patricia Dechow In an era when a stock can take a beating if earnings fall a penny short of analysts' predictions, what factors influence whether forecasters seek precision to the penny or round off -- and how should their choice affect investors?

Berkeley-Haas Accounting Professor Patricia Dechow found that rounded forecasts are not only significantly more inaccurate than those that strive for penny-precision but also significantly more upwardly biased. The sharpest differences in both respects occur in companies with annual earnings per share of less than $10. Learn more.